ADVICE FROM THE SON OF A LAWYER & THOUGHTS ABOUT EXPERT WITNESSES

ADVICE FROM THE SON OF A LAWYER & THOUGHTS ABOUT EXPERT WITNESSES

I have a two unrelated subjects I’d like to discuss with you today. One is helpful advice from a non lawyer which we can benefit from and the other some thoughts about advice for your expert witnesses.

Regarding the first, Sunday’s NY Times has an interview with Jake Wobbrock who is the founding CEO of AnswerDash. It is a service that can be downloaded to a website to create answers to customers questions. Jake is professor at the U of W in Seattle and what is of interest is that his father is Portland plaintiff’s lawyer Larry Wobbrock, one of Oregon’s very best trial lawyers,  some of you may know. Here is one article about Larry’s skills as a plaintiff lawyer:

http://www.superlawyers.com/oregon/lawfirm/Lawrence-Wobbrock-Trial-Lawyer-PC/171692ca-31e3-4e8a-ae0e-1e2863e916ce.html

Jake says, in the interview, that his father taught him that in life everyone would like to be a hero at something but that there is no way to be a hero without risking failure, or as he says become “the goat.” He explains his father taught him that if you are at the foul line in a basketball game with two shots which can win the game and no time left you have the opportunity to be a hero but only at the risk of being the goat. His father told him that if you shy away out of fear of being the goat, you can never be a hero. It’s only by embracing both you can become a hero. He says we should seek growth through risk taking, not comfort. Great advice for those of us fearful of acting outside of our comfort zone as plaintiff lawyers.

Jake says to be able to maintain focus for sustained periods is a requirement of greatness. Identifying what is important sand sticking with it is essential. Great advice for those of us who allow defense distractions to get us to chase multiple rabbits when we should have singular focus in our cases.

He says that in hiring people for his company he looks for “the three A’s” which are: Aptitude, attitude and appetite. Aptitude is the skill and ability to perform. Attitude refers to a positive determination to succeed. Appetite refers to a passion for the work, to accomplish and to succeed. Certainly no great plaintiff’s lawyer ever succeeded without passion for those we represent.

The second subject I’m discussing because of an article I recently read about it which I thought made sense. Preparing experts as witnesses is always a challenge because they very often are not open to advice since they see themselves as experts and experts give, not take, advice. Yet I’ve seen some really bad expert testimony in my life, although I flatter myself that most of it came from the defense expert on cross examination. So here are a few fundamental thoughts about being an expert witness:

  1. Listen carefully & think before you answer. Listening is the single most important thing you can do. Thinking is also critical, but not long pauses after every question before responding.
  2. Answer only one question at a time. Far too often witnesses fail to grasp that a question is really not one question but more than one – we call it a compound question. How it’s handled is important. The expert should not be a smart aleck or become a lawyer in their response. If it is a simple statement one could simply break the answer into two answers: “As to your question about drugs. The answer is that there were none. As to your question about speeding, the car was going within the speed limit.” Or one could say: “I’m sorry , but there was more than one question in your statement. Could you restate your question.”  If you only listen to the first and last part of a complex compound question you may give incorrect testimony, Listen carefully.
  3. If important, respond if cut off or interrupted. Not all interruptions to your answer are important and even if you don’t point out the interruption it can reflect back on the manners of the lawyer asking. But, if important, simply wait until he lawyer has finished and say: “I’m sorry, but I had not finished answer your last question which I would like to finish.” Usually the judge will help you.
  4. Don’t guess. While it’s important for you never to act like you are deliberately being uncooperative by refusing to acknowledge obvious things you should, it is equally important you do not guess at important matters. If you don’t know the answer say so. If you know, but can’t remember say “I can’t recall at this time” or “without refreshing my memory.”  If  it is outside your expert area, say so. If you weren’t asked to investigate a subject say “That’s not something I asked to review and haven’t done so.”
  5. What about “yes or no” questions? If you can answer truthfully do so  with a yes or a no and follow with explanation “because…..” If you can’t say so: “I can’t answer truthfully with only a yes or a no without an explanation.” Or consider, if true, “yes, but only the way you have stated the question, but not in this case”

So, the basic rules for experts  are (1) listen and make sure you understand before you answer. Don’t answer until you understand (2) think before you answer (3) be calm and professionally respectful no matter what the demeanor of the cross examiner and (4) tell the truth.

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