TAKE A LESSON FROM THE MOVIES & TV – SHORT BUT POWERFUL

TAKE A LESSON FROM THE MOVIES & TV – SHORT BUT POWERFUL

Trial lawyers generally over try their cases and talk to too much. It’s a mistake. Jurors of today have short attention spans and respond to messages that get to the point. Here are examples of what I think demonstrates how a brief, simple message can be very powerful. They are not long. They are not detailed, but they tell a story and do so in a simple well-crafted manner. That’s what we, as trial lawyers should strive to achieve. Delicious is…

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FASTER HORSES, YOUNGER WOMEN, OLDER WHISKEY & MORE MONEY

FASTER HORSES, YOUNGER WOMEN, OLDER WHISKEY & MORE MONEY

The King County Bar Bulletin, https://www.kcba.org/?pg=News-Bar-Bulletin publishes a column by Thomas M. O’Toole, Ph.D. & Kevin R. Boully, Ph.D, trial consultants. A recent issue featured their ideas in a column titled Escaping “Lawyer Brain” in Jury Presentations. It dealt with “developing a communication style that resonates with jurors, one that is both persuasive and engaging.” I thought it made excellent points and should be shared. What has that got to do with the title I chose? Well, I thought about…

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RESPONSE TO EVASIVE ANSWER

RESPONSE TO EVASIVE ANSWER

Dr. Ken Broda-Bahm writes a blog Your Trial Message which is directed to the defense bar. However, his insights are often accurate and helpful to understand. His focus recently has been on the concept of using the “Reptile” approach by plaintiff lawyers. In his April 9th post recently, he wrote: “The Reptile approach to courtroom persuasion aims to sell plaintiffs’ cases by invoking absolute duties for protection wrapped around a fear appeal that resonates with the jurors. Even with the Reptile’s…

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