Trial tips from shakespeare

Some thoughts from poetry for trial lawyers:

Understanding Injuries:

"He jests at scars, that never felt a wound."Willaim Shakespeare Romeo & Juliet

Personal Character:

"Beware if entrance to a quarrel, but, being in, bear ‘t that the opposed may beware of thee. Give every many thine ear, but few they voice. Take each man’s censure, but reserve thy judgment. Costly thy habit as thy purse can buy, But not expressed in fancy; rich, not gaudy; For the apparel oft proclims the man…This above all: To thine own self be true, nd it mut follow, as the night the day, thou canst not then be false any man."
William Shakespeare Hamlet

Knowing when to Stop

"To gild refined gold, to paint the ily, To t hrow perfume on the violet, to smooth the ice, or add another hue unto the rainbow, or with taper-light to seek the beauteous eye of heaven to garnish, is wasteful and riduclous excess. William Shakespeare King John

About Paul Luvera

Plaintiff trial lawyer for 50 years. Past President of the Inner Circle of Advocates & Washington State Trial Lawyers Association. Member American Board of Trial Advocates, American College of Trial Lawyers, International Academy, International Society of Barristers, member of the National Trial Lawyers Hall of Fame & speaker at Spence Trial College
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