Forgeting you and becoming real

When I graduated from Anacortes high school in 1953 I thought I was a great athlete since I had been given a basketball and football scholarship at the University of Washington. At six feet two inches I had played center and was proud of scoring ten or so points in a game. Fifteen points was a big night. Total scores of our games were in the forties. As you might guess, today I wouldn’t even be allowed to sit on the bench of any high school team today. I wouldn’t be tall enough norgood enough compared to the youngsters today.So, I was very impressed to read about a local basketball player who played amazing game the other night. The Gig Harbor Peninsula Gateway newspaper reports that the Gig Harbor Tides beat Central Kitsap 83 to 78 in a close overtime game. But, the real news was that Gig Harbor player, Mathias Ward, set several records by scoring an amazing 56 points in the game as well as rebounding 23 timeswith 18 assists and made 19 free throws -all records. It demonstrates that the limitations we have are almost always in our mind and that our attitudes determine our success. I think safe to say that young Ward was in a "zone" where he was not conscious of his actions for the most part, but was rather reacting without reflecting on it. In athletics, as well as sometimes in life, it’s when we think about what we are doing that we become self conscious, nervous and choke up. One lesson here is that Mathias Ward probably had no clue that he was capable of doing all of this until he did it. Trial skills are a lot like this in the sense we are best when we are not worried about how we look, how we sound and give up trying to be someone, but instead drop all the masks to become a genuine person people. It’s honesty and sincerity that peoplerelate to.

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